Thursday, November 26, 2015

Tis the Season . . .

. . . to shop apparently!  At least that's what my email told me this morning.  But I will admit that after the food is cooked and eaten and cleaned up, I do like to do a little shopping.  So if you are looking to shop for gifts or add to your stash or stock up on supplies, here are a few opportunities to check out.
But first a little shameless self-promotion.  All quilts in my shop are 15% off through Monday.  Just use coupon code HANDMADEHOLIDAY.

FabricCadabra has 20% all orders Friday - Monday using coupon code BLACKFRIDAY20.

The Fat Quarter Shop is offering 25% off all orders through Saturday at Midnight, no code required.

Lark Cottons has 25% off sitewide through December 2nd using code TURKEY25.

Fabricworm has 15% off sitewide, plus a clearance section with 30-60% with coupon code HOLIDAY until Monday at 5pm PST.

Monday, November 23, 2015

Picnic Basket Quilt

Over the last few days I have finished up this custom order quilt.  The woman who ordered it has bought a couple of my other quilts and contacted me asking if I was planning on making a quilt using Melody Miller's Picnic collection.  I wasn't planning anything, but after a few emails we worked out a design and I got to work.
picnic basket quilt
When I make a quilt I like to reflect on how I feel about the fabrics when the quilt is finished.  Before I started this project I really liked this collection and now that I am done I really love it.  I know that people love her typewriters, but this is definitely my favorite Melody Miller collection.  
picnic basket quilt
There are a couple of Cottton + Steel basics mixed in with the Picnic prints and the solid fabric is Kona Bone.  It is white, but just a little vintage-y.
picnic basket quilt
The backing is the blue picnic baskets print. I love all of the detail that was put into the baskets and bowls, especially the green basket with the flowers on it.  
picnic basket quilt
For the quilting I did crosshatching to echo along the seam lines.  I really like how it made a mix of squares and rectangles and it kind of reminds me of a basketweave pattern.  

Finished size: 60" x 80"

Picnic fabrics are available:

Monday, November 16, 2015

Simple, Lined Envelope Pouch Tutorial

A few weeks ago a friend (who is a nurse) told me that a local hospital had a need for pouches to send home belongings with families.  I contacted the good people at Art Gallery Fabrics and they graciously donated a variety of their new canvas prints (and Pure Elements solids for the linings) so that I can make a big stack of pouches.
art gallery canvas
They are gorgeous!  I am very impressed with how the canvas is simultaneously sturdy and soft.  They have a very nice drape and a great texture.  I actually already bought some more for myself to use for Christmas presents.  
canvas envelope pouches
So I set out to find a tutorial to make the pouch, but I couldn't find anything that described exactly what I wanted.  Since I was able to work out a pretty simple method, I thought I would share it with you.  These are fairly large (8" x 13.5") since that is what I needed for my purpose, but you could make them any size.  
canvas envelope pouch
canvas envelope pouch
Use a 1/2" seam allowance
canvas envelope pouch
canvas envelope pouch
canvas envelope pouch
I'm sorry, I forgot to get a photo of the next step so hopefully you can visualize it from the photo below.  Fold up the bottom of the fabric so that it has a 3.5" overlap with the folded down top fabric.
canvas envelope pouch
The the pouch right side out and give it a little press with your iron.
canvas envelope pouch
And look, it's lined!
canvas envelope pouch
And now you have a pouch that will safely contain your things without having to use a zipper.  

Sunday, November 15, 2015

RJR Cotton Supreme Solids Bundle Winner

The winner of the RJR Cotton Supreme Solids bundle is . . .

Jenny!  Who had some wonderful advice.  Jenny, I don't see an email on your profile so watch for a DM from me on Instagram.
intertwined quilt
Thank you everyone for the love about the quilt.  I had a few people ask if I was going to write a tutorial and my answer is . . . probably not? It would be more likely if we could magically add a few hours to my day.

I hope you all had a great weekend!

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Intertwined Quilt and Giveaway- RJR Cotton Supreme Solids

I have recently had the opportunity to work on a project for RJR Fabrics for the second time (first time here); this time I primarily used Cotton Supreme Solids with Cotton + Steel's Lucky Strikes collection mixed in.  
intertwined quilt
Did you know that RJR manufactures Cotton + Steel?  That means that their solids match perfectly.  And they are lovely and soft and vibrant.  I used a color scheme for the solids that was inspired by Lucky Strikes and then mixed in a few of the prints.  
intertwined quilt
Originally I was planning to use on point squares for the quilt, but decided to try something a little different.  Can you see the shape?  It's a half hourglass/half HST block (does this have a name?) and involved a little bit of trimming but I thought it was a fun way to make the quilt.  
intertwined quilt block closeup
I quilted 4 diagonal lines, 1 inch apart along each of the stripes.  You might be wondering if that is enough quilting, and it isn't.  I am going to do some hand quilting in each of the squares which will take me quite a while so I decided to go ahead and share.  It will be a good project to work on during the holidays and you will probably be seeing this quilt again when the hand quilting is finished.
intertwined quilt
For the backing I used this gorgeous Lucky Strikes print.  It is amazing and the pink colorway is just as good. 

The binding is a navy RJR Cotton Supreme Solids solid.  While I was working on hand sewing the binding I started to wonder: am I the slowest hand sewer ever? Maybe.  One thing that has helped me though is using thread conditioner (I use this one) to keep thread from getting tangled and knotted.  How did I not know about this before?  But even with that help I am still slow

GIVEAWAY: To enter a fat quarter bundle of the solids I used in this quilt, please leave me a comment below!  I will pick a winner on Sunday November 15th.  

Finished size: 63" x 70"

Monday, November 2, 2015

Half Rectangle Triangle Quilt

A few weeks ago I started spending some time with a women from our church congregation who is expecting her first child.  She has dealt with depression and anxiety in the past and is spending time with various people to help manage her issues while she is pregnant.  I thought it would be a fun project to work on a quilt each time she visited.
HRT Quilt
We talked about colors and fabrics and picking a design that would have lots of contrast and ended up with a bright, scrappy combo which included lots of Ann Kelle prints.  Her baby shower is tomorrow, and her baby boy is due to be born in about a month, so I spent some time this weekend finishing up the quilt.  
HRT Quilt
I decided to go with half rectangle triangles for the quilt which is something I have wanted to try since seeing Rita's quilt.  There are a couple of tutorials out there on how to make HRTs, but it is a little more complicated and annoying than I was willing to deal with so I went ahead and bought this ruler.  It is not cheap, and it was difficult to find, but it was easy and worth it to me since I intend to make more of these in the future.

The backing and the binding of the quilt are also Ann Kelle.  I love that bias stripe, it's the second time I have used this print as a binding.  
HRT Quilt
Finished size: 34" x 34"

And just for fun, a picture of this happy guy.  He is the sweetest!
August :)

Friday, October 30, 2015

How to Create a 9 Generation Family Tree for your Kids (or yourself)

This is not quilting related, but it stems from a post I made on Instagram that I have had a few emails and comments about so I thought I would share the information here.  I promise that I am still sewing and I will have something new to show you next week :)
When I was in elementary school, my class did a unit and we were asked to bring in our family tree.  My Mom and I spent hours and hours over several days writing in the names on a pedigree chart to bring in.  Even though the teacher was really only asking us to write up a family tree with our parents and grandparents, I have very fond memories of working on this project.

My daughter is starting a similar unit at school and she wanted to see her family tree.  If you are interested in generating a fan chart like this for yourself or for one of your kids, here is some info on how to do it.

I am a Mormon and family history is kind of a big deal to us, so I have benefited from work done by family members and my chart is almost full.  If you are just getting started on your family history work, you can print off your chart with the information that you have now and fill it in as you work. If you haven't done any family history work yet, I highly recommend starting with; it is free and has amazing resources.

1.  If you do not have a account with your information saved in it, you will need a GEDCOM file with your family history.  This is the type of file supported by most genealogy programs, including (directions here). You can actually generate a chart like this directly through Family Search, but the largest size it offers is 7 generations.

2.  Go to  From this website you can either login to your Family Search profile and download your information into a variety of charts (I used the 9 generation black and white chart) or you can upload a GEDCOM file without having to login.

3.  Pick the person whose chart you would like to generate.  It should give you the choice of you, your parents, or your kids.  Note that if you are making a chart for one of your kids and you are logged into your Family Search account or are using a GEDCOM file with your family history on it, only half of the chart will be generated.  If your child is older than 8 (mine aren't) they can have their own Family Search account.

If you are making the chart for yourself or for one of your parents, you are now done!  Skip down to step 6 for printing info.

4.  Once you have generated a chart that has your child's name at the base and half of their family history on it, login your child's father's profile and generate the same chart.  This should look just the same, except it will have information on the left instead of the right.

5.  Merge the images.  I'm sure there are multiple photo editing programs that are capable of this task, but I used Photoshop (and honestly this is so easy to do that if you just email me the files I can do it for you).  If you are using Photoshop, open both files (they are PDFs) side by side.  Hold down the shift key and drag one of the images onto the other.  Holding down the shift key centers the image when it is moved and since the image are the same size, it should line up perfectly.  Select the eraser tool and erase half of the image so that the information underneath will show through.  Save the finished images as a JPEG.

6.  Print the image.  I used the Engineering Print option from Staples.  My charts are 24" x 36" and cost a whopping $3.
I hope that wasn't too confusing because the process was really not difficult.  If you have any questions or if you are interested in learning more about family history work, please let me know!
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