Wednesday, August 27, 2014

do. Good Stitches Block Tutorial and August Bee Blocks

Before anything else, I need a little advice.  In a couple weeks I am going to be teaching a beginning quilting class to some ladies at church and I am not quite sure what to make in the class.  I am going to have 45 minutes (ha ha, I know, that's not enough time) and we are making a quilt top.  The fabric will need to be cut in advance so that time needs to just be for piecing.

Someone suggested that we make rag quilts, but I have never made one and I am not a huge fan so I would rather do something else.  I am thinking that we should just do a baby quilt with big squares (maybe 8" or 10"), but is that too boring?  What would you want to make?  Thanks in advance.  I have never done anything like this so I am a little nervous!

Ok, back to the bee blocks.  For August in the do. Good Stitches Wish Circle, Steph asked us to make Friendship Star blocks using this tutorial in pink, red, maroon, aqua, or mustard.
friendship star blocks
September is my month as quilter in the do. Good Stitches Wish Circle so as I was thinking about choosing a block today I starting sewing some scraps together and cutting them apart and sewing them back together and came up with a block that I will be fun.  I don't know if this block has a name or if there are other tutorials out there, but I couldn't find one so I wrote up a quick one.

Fabric Requirements:
4.5" square Fabric A (the green print)
2.5" x WOF Fabric B (the floral print)
2.5" x WOF Fabric C (the blue/black print)
10" x WOF White Fabric
dgs september block
So here is the tutorial for my fellow Wish Circle members (or anyone else who wants to make the block).  Sorry about two tutorials in one week, I can't keep up this pace but it just worked out that way!
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
dgs september block
It's a strip block without the paper piecing.  
Alternate these 4 blocks into the layout below and piece together.  The finished block is 16.5".
dgs september block

28 comments :

  1. I'll start the suggestions. I think you should use a jelly roll pattern. All of the pieces could be cut to same size and they would select 4 strips, sew one block each and focus on placement. I recommend these free patterns by Lyn Brown.
    http://www.lynbrown.com/rockin-roll-jelly-roll-complete-quilt/
    http://www.lynbrown.com/jelly-roll-california-rail/
    I've made one of them myself.
    http://wendysquiltsandmore.blogspot.co.nz/2014/05/blue-garden-is-finished.html

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  2. I want to come to your class!

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  3. An easy fun quilt, especially for novices, is the disappearing 9 patch. The combinations are just fun and gets them used to cutting in case they might have an inkling for modern.

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  4. If you only have 45 minutes, I would agree with Wendy about using jelly rolls, but I would not cut them. Make strip quilts letting the new quilters focus on that all important 1/4" seam and play with color placement of the fabric. Good luck!

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  5. fun to see, how this Comes together :)

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  6. I'd steer clear of jelly rolls (too small, perhaps, for people trying to perfect their 1/4 inch seam?). I love your initial idea of a baby quilt with patchwork. Personally, I never tire of patchwork (much to my husband's dismay!). I'd use 6-inch blocks, though, because I think it'd be a bit more interesting than the bigger sizes. With this, I think you could focus on 1) quarter-inch seam, 2)chain-piecing, 3) pressing to the dark side, and 4) fabric choice and layout.

    Then, I'd bring in some of your quilts (or photos since you give so many away) that showcase patchwork. This one simple skill can look so different!

    1. Modern (your Plus quilt; BYU pixel quilt; and Pixelated heart table runner)

    2. Traditional (Road Fifteen sixteen patch, using sashing; Sixteen Patch, using solids; Postage Stamp quilt, discuss the use of volume; Scrappy Trip)

    3. Just plain pretty (Charley Harper; Granny Square; and Pretty Penny Patch, touching on the use of scale)

    Good luck! I'm sure that whatever you choose, it'll be great!

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  7. The original turning 20. Big pieces are easy to cut and forgiving if they aren't cut perfect. It is what I always recommend to beginners who don't want to just sew squares.

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  8. My very first quilt was a nine patch, learned from a class at church. Rotary cutters were a new and exciting invention. I was hooked.




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  9. How about a rail fence pattern. That was my first quilt class. If you use jelly rolls the cutting is done. You didn't mention the level of quilters in your group.

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  10. I'm a huge fan of Kristy Daum's Modernized D9P. It's a great twist on a traditional block, and having everything cut beforehand is easy since you just need 5 inch blocks (or whatever size you want). Great for beginners! http://stlouisfolkvictorian.blogspot.com/2012/07/modernized-d9p.html

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  11. Rail fence is always a good beginner quilt too. Long strips to sew and then some sub cutting to make the blocks then they can see the pattern forming very quickly.
    Have fun!

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  12. Such a clever block! Sounds like your church group is going to be a fun challenge. I have no suggestions other than just be encouraging. From teaching computer classes at the library, I've found that classes in general are really there not to necessarily instill knowledge but to give people confidence and guidance to try new things themselves :)

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  13. Maybe you should teach a mini quilt or just do a 12' block and make it a small wall hanging. Good luck!

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  14. I agree disappearing nine patch is a very impressive but simple pattern. Cluckclucksew has an easy tutorial. Sometimes long strips can be too hard for beginners

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  15. The first thing that came to my mind was the "Jelly Roll Jam" quilt. You can find the pattern for free here:

    http://www.fatquartershop.com/free-quilt-pattern-jelly-roll-jam-free-quilt-pattern

    It makes a 36.5x36.5 inch baby quilt. Each quilt takes only half a jelly roll plus fabric for binding and backing along with batting. You wouldn't have to use Jelly Rolls but buy yardage and cut the strips ahead of time.

    Congratulations on taking on this task and good luck with it.

    Phyllis

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  16. Especially if you already have squares cut out, how about pair them RST light/dark and make quick, half-square triangle blocks, then show different ways to combine--blocks or overall quilt design playing with contrast and values.
    Have fun and happy sewing! Hugs from Germany, Bobbi

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  17. Most important is that the new quilters come away with something
    finished--or close to it. I don't think they will mind at all if the project is too simple. Good luck! I like the disappearing 9 patch too.

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  18. Oh--you could also have everyone make one or two blocks and then put them all together for a baby quilt to give away.

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  19. How about a rail fence? It's easy and was the first one I was taught to make. It's very to adapt for use as a baby quilt or grownup.

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  20. I think for someone who has not quilted before, doing a simple squares quilt is not boring. They have the fun of choosing the fabrics ahead of time =) Hey, we still like making simple squares quilts sometimes, right?

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  21. Squares - maybe a plus quilt layout?

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  22. How about a disappearing 9-patch?

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  23. I would make a potholder. Everyone can use one plus you would have time to piece, baste, quilt and bind. Leaving with a finished product will be just the ticket for those interested.

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  24. I really love the churn dash blocks they are simple and come together quickly. They also look fantastic in almost any fabric. I also really like the spools blocks. I have seen so many variations on this one. The granny square blocks are my favorite, but is probably not suitable for a first block.

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  25. That's not very much time... any way you could beg for more? ;-) Maybe a rail fence block?

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  26. Fourty five minutes will go quickly. Maybe this baby quilt from Missouri quilt company? It is an easy and cute quilt as you go baby quilt. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rl_OPPpXNLM

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  27. You will do so great! I love the St. Louis 16 patch as a quick block with cool technique. http://sewwithsass.blogspot.com/2013/04/quilts-st-louis-16-patch.html

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  28. Missouri Star Quilt Company has so many great tutorials. You can teach yourself then teach others...so easy. Im an advanced beginner too.. Bless you!

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